Thursday, June 5, 2014

Re:Hey, all you Jane Austen lovers

I've read a few of her books. They are good. It has been a while though, so thank you for the reminder. :)
Jamie

Sent from my Virgin Mobile phone.

Lynness Hawkes <lynnesshawkes@gmail.com> wrote:

>Just wanted to pass on an author I've been reading lately- no one new:
>Georgette Heyer (Mim and Rachel have probably heard of her). Her books
>were mostly written in the 1940s and '50s, but they are set in the
>Regency period and will seem familiar to those who love Pride and
>Prejudice, etc.. There are a few mysteries, but for the most part, they
>are romances. I've only read a couple ("Arabella" and "Faro's
>Daughter"), but they have been totally clean and enjoyable.
>-Lynness
>
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>This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
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Hey, all you Jane Austen lovers

Just wanted to pass on an author I've been reading lately- no one new:
Georgette Heyer (Mim and Rachel have probably heard of her). Her books
were mostly written in the 1940s and '50s, but they are set in the
Regency period and will seem familiar to those who love Pride and
Prejudice, etc.. There are a few mysteries, but for the most part, they
are romances. I've only read a couple ("Arabella" and "Faro's
Daughter"), but they have been totally clean and enjoyable.
-Lynness

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

Saturday, August 24, 2013

(QAIT) It's nice to dive into a book!

I've done some reading this summer, but everything was very busy. I don't really remember what I read anymore. Except for one book that I picked up after we finally settled on a house and knew where we'd live! Once that stress was sorted out, I felt more able to concentrate on a book. I think I picked the best book to get lost in! :D
I read "The Thirteenth Tale" that is quoted in the header of this blog. And wow, what a fascinatingly strange story! I ADORED the plot twists, particularly the one at the last third of the book-- when I read the pivotal, shocking words, I gasped! I got goosebumps! I breathed "whoa! No way!" and at the same time, I felt like I KNEW that was how the plot had to go. That was a pretty awesome moment.
That's when I really, really appreciate the skill of an author. Books like that are so exciting!
Before moving on from it, I'm going to read it to Michael. I can't just hand it over and let him read to himself...I have to watch him discover it, and I'm eager to read it again knowing what I know....

But when I do move on to another book, does anyone have a suggestion? Is there a book that is maybe close to thrilling like that? I know there is somewhere out there...

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Lynness: Some recent reads

"Predictably Irrational: The hidden forces that shape our decisions"- Interesting and well written.  I'm sure I would fall prey to most of the same biases presented, but I'm pretty sure some of them (monetary related ones, especially) I would not (because of my scrooge-like nature).

"Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking"- Not as engaging as I had hoped, but enough interesting stuff to keep me going.  Learned a few things about myself and how to deal with other people.  Nathan is reading it too.  (How many of you on this book group are also introverts?)

"Unaccountable: What hospitals won't tell you and how transparency can revolutionize health care"- WOW.  I picked this up off the New Arrivals shelf along with another book or two, and ate it up.  Many people might find it tedious, but as a nurse, I found it fascinating.  I could really see myself getting into this field at some point- combines health, business, politics.  Not that I'm at all interested in politics, but I do believe that a lot of the ills of the health care system could be remedied with these ideas, including better patient outcomes, better revenue, better policy.

"Next: The future just happened"- It was ok.  Interesting case studies about how society at large and individuals and the internet interact, a bit dated now- would be interested to see an updated edition or follow-up book.

"The Long Earth" - Interesting idea and enjoyable, but at the end, you're left with, "That's all?  So...what?  Oh, well...next book."

"American Wasteland"- Makes you think a lot about food waste- industrial and commercial and in your own kitchen.  Makes you want to be a little greener, but it's such a huge problem.  I am comforted to realize that, while our family in particular probably wastes more food than we think we do (like most), we waste much less than most (compared to other Americans, anyway).  We regularly have "smorgasbord" (i.e. all the leftovers in the fridge) nights and I use up those half sweet potatoes, etc. by pureeing them and putting them in soups, etc.  I buy food at grocery salvage stores regularly and use things past expiration dates by trusting my senses rather than packaging.

Friday, December 7, 2012

Lynness: best fiction I've read in a while

I enjoy historical fiction, and I blew through "The Time In Between"
quickly. (When I'm done with books like that, I wish I had taken more
time to savor it, but while I'm reading, I don't want to stop!) It's
long, but I wouldn't have minded more. I'll let you discover it for
yourself.

Monday, August 6, 2012

Lynness- regarding Nurture Shock

A really relevant and interesting book. I am going to read it again
right away and TAKE NOTES about what this might change. The main point
is that a lot of the things we're told we should do as parents to make
our kids smarter or discourage/encourage this or that behavior is based
on great-sounding ideas. But these ideas were thought up by adults, and
kids' minds don't work the same way. It doesn't tell you what you
SHOULD do, but it shows results from studies that are finally being done
to see if all these ideas really work and give you some insight as to
why they often don't.

Friday, July 6, 2012

Lynness: Is it just me...

...or is it echoing here?

Hello...........(hello)........................(hello)....................................(hello)...........................................

Anybody else reading out there?

I recently enjoyed The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters.   I guess that's very weird, but I really like books that integrate science and social science and interesting info in a very readable way.  Another one to make you think about what you take for granted, but don't be offended by the s-word throughout; after all, that's what it's all about!

I'm also reading the books on Isaiah's Battle of the Books list (titles include the Mysterious Benedict Society- I only thought it was ok- and From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. B.E.F.- which I didn't actually read b/c I've read it many times ), and his summer reading assignment (Magickeepers, vol 1- which I thought was like an after-school cartoon episode- quick-paced, ill-developed
characters and plot (almost like those round-robin stories where each person continues the story), etc.  Much lamer than the usual summer assignments have been for his CBG program).  I picked up a couple of random books for him the last time we went to the library Wildwood and The Books of Elsewhere: The Shadows (vol 1).    Enjoyed Wildwood the best of all his new books so far.